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Are these serious problems?

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I'm a complete newbie and I've had an offer accepted on a two bedroom house and had a survey done.  The survey has brought up all sorts of problems, but I'm not sure what I should do next!  Are these really serious?  Should I renegotiate the price?  Should I get further specialists to look at the problems and give me quotes on the work before I exchange contracts?  The house is end of terrace and dates from 1900.

These are the main problems:

1.  The roof.  The survey says, "The main roof covering may be nearing, if not exceeding life expectancy.  Also, there is daylight visible to areas within the roof space, indicating a defect.  I recommend you seek advice from a qualified roofing contractor." 

2.  Bricks.  The survey says that a number of bricks have deterioriated on the external walls.

3.  Damp.  There is prominent damp throughout the property, but the survey doesn't say if it is rising damp, and recommends I get a damp proof specialist to look at it.  There are also rotting skirting boards and joinery.

4.  Ceilings.  Two of the bedrooms have polystyrene tiles which are a safety hazard and need to be removed.

5.  The ground and first floor outrigger floors slope prominently which could mean they are not property supported or there is a defect.

Are these serious problems?  Would you get a roof specialist and a damp specialist to do surveys before commiting to purchase?

 

Any advice welcome!  Thanks

 

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Hi 

I'm in the same boat, AGAIN...

I have 2 surveys on my desk at the moment and both are vague and suggesting further reports.

From experience, call in a trade from each area and ask for their opinion and gauge it from there rather than paying for more surveys.

Obv damp is a bit of a tricky one as it is area where there has been lots of abuse in the last few years. Damp can usually be easily resolved once you get in there and start peeling things back.

Also, I would hope  unless you have already agreed a bargain price, that you will be able to renegotiate based on any quotes you get in for major works.

However, that is an area that I am currently facing difficulty in.

Thanks, Mark

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On 3/21/2019 at 11:56 AM, 00mrmark00 said:

From experience, call in a trade from each area and ask for their opinion and gauge it from there rather than paying for more surveys.

Mark, do you mean to get tradesmen to meet you at the property and give their opinion, for free?  Do they do that?

What I did next was get a damp and timber survey and met the surveyor there, and from his report and the previous report, and from his comments in person I realised that the property needs a lot more work rather than just cosmetic (which I had initially thought) so I'm not going to buy it.

 

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On 3/29/2019 at 3:46 PM, cathie said:

Mine was the cheaper survey (not the full structural one).  Is it better to get the full one to avoid this kind of confusion?

 

That depends, and essentially depends on how experienced the potential purchaser is in spotting defects etc.

This might give you an idea of what to go for: http://www.romans.co.uk/news-article/the-difference-between-a-building-survey-and-homebuyer-report/312

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On 3/21/2019 at 11:48 PM, dennis hughes said:

Both of you have similar topics, here and elsewhere in the forum.

Could I ask if these were full structural surveys or homebuyer surveys?

Homebuyers - which to be honest I could do a better job of myself. This is the 4th survey I have seen in the last 6 months and most have errors in them.

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On 3/29/2019 at 3:48 PM, cathie said:

Mark, do you mean to get tradesmen to meet you at the property and give their opinion, for free?  Do they do that?

What I did next was get a damp and timber survey and met the surveyor there, and from his report and the previous report, and from his comments in person I realised that the property needs a lot more work rather than just cosmetic (which I had initially thought) so I'm not going to buy it.

 

Yes - so if it states the roof is near the end of its life, get a roofer around to give you their opinion and quote for the work. Also a good way of getting a feel for decent tradesmen and filtering out the cr@p - of which there is a lot...

Also - check out this website for a great insight into the world of damp - https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/the-fraud-of-rising-damp.html

I also have been advised to seek a timber and damp report - I managed to get someone to do one without me parting with any cash and low and behold it needs a full damp course and tanking on every wall. Plaster off 1m high all the way around- even the internal walls. 

However - go out of the back and you can see the fascia board has come away with the gutter attached, so water is pouring down the wall, and the rear yard is higher than the damp course. Both of which will be causing the damp to penetrate rather than rise.

I'm still buying it... Maybe I'm mad ;)

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1 hour ago, 00mrmark00 said:

Yes - so if it states the roof is near the end of its life, get a roofer around to give you their opinion and quote for the work. Also a good way of getting a feel for decent tradesmen and filtering out the cr@p - of which there is a lot...

Also - check out this website for a great insight into the world of damp - https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/the-fraud-of-rising-damp.html

I also have been advised to seek a timber and damp report - I managed to get someone to do one without me parting with any cash and low and behold it needs a full damp course and tanking on every wall. Plaster off 1m high all the way around- even the internal walls. 

However - go out of the back and you can see the fascia board has come away with the gutter attached, so water is pouring down the wall, and the rear yard is higher than the damp course. Both of which will be causing the damp to penetrate rather than rise.

I'm still buying it... Maybe I'm mad ;)

I make no comment either way, this is just for information only. Take from it what you will. :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Poj9mSjtfUU

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The hats on the first 2 sites are fake. If you look at the spiderman hat closely it has a mlb sitcker on it lol. Also, somebdy has posted these websites before and we have decided that they were fake.

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To say rising damp doesn’t exist is not entirely true. I often see walls below dpc damp and walls above dry. Seems pretty obvious.
The problems come in on old properties that have been tampered with. Heritage house advice is excellent albeit very much to original spec. Conversely damp proofing companies always blast it with chemicals and cement. The real solution is normally a hybrid because often old houses, just like new ones, weren’t built very well in the first place.

How did the OP get on? Did you buy the property? Sounds like pretty major refurbishment works so would need a discount to match.

 

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