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Most valuable habits for life


kent614

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There are some really great quotes on habits, such as : 

"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit"

and also, 

"Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going"

And I have been reading books on how to develop habits, and small habits developed today can have a massive impact over the rest of our lives. 

So I am interested to know, What habits do you guys have ? What habits do you think is the most valuable and useful especially over the long term, and any suggestions or ideas on how one can start to develop those habits and make those small changes for big impact ?

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1) Spend less than you earn. Everything else you can do after that, but if you don't get that bit you'll always be poor regardless of how much stuff you have around you.

2) Buy assets, not liabilities. Use your assets to pay for your liabilities. Probably the key thing from Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Doesn'tmatter whether you work for others or for yourself, spend less than you earn and buy assets and one day you'll be free to live the life you want without the job. How quickly is just a matter of scale

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Plan your day the night before, and identify your most important task so you can do it first. I've been doing it for years, and there's a bit efficiency boost from waking up knowing exactly what you're going to do. It also gives your brain the ability to be processing it in the background overnight.

I also believe that seeing the positive in situations is a habit. If you spend 60 days deliberately trying to find the silver lining in everything bad that happens (even if it's a struggle and you don't actually believe what you're telling yourself), you'll eventually "brainwash" yourself and start doing it automatically.

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I always remind myself that every moment of the day is a choice, down to how I feel, and that I can always change what I'm doing.

It helps me to take control of my days and my life, rather than being passive and going along with what's 'normal', easiest, or just the status quo, often without realising.

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Planning out what I need to do by writing it all down. Adding reminders to my calendar, this ensures I know what needs to be done and by when. This makes it a lot easier for me than having to remember it all. I'm bound to forget something or miss a deadline

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I'm nowhere near where I'd like to be, but I have recently started making the right choices to move towards that direction. These are a few of the habits I've used that help keep me on track:

 -Setting goals (daily, weekly, monthly, yearly) 

-Getting a good sleep, everyone is different but personally that means 8 hours minimum.

-Positive thinking/visualising where I want to be.

-Exercising. Getting outside and enjoying nature helps to reset your mind when going back to work. 

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Okay, so I just finished the book Getting Things Done by Dave Allan. 

To apparently the brain is for thinking, finding solutions and creativity, not for storage and recall. 

So as a recommendation from the book, the habit I am trying to develop is to write all my ideas and to do down, as soon as it comes into my head. This will free up my brain processing power to develop more ideas instead of memorizing existing ideas and to do list. 

Having the list will also better help to follow up, as the brain often forgets most of the ideas it tries to remember. 

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4 hours ago, kent614 said:

Okay, so I just finished the book Getting Things Done by Dave Allan. 

Hi kent614. I've read his book too, and watched a few videos on his website, which offer detailed suggestions of how to implement the ideas in his book using modern tools like Evernote and the Google suite. (The book's almost 20 years old so outdated on the practical side.)

I've found it very beneficial since I started following his ideas, like my brain isn't so 'busy' because it's freed up, exactly like you say. I'd recommend them to everyone.

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Being in the 5 am club. Its much easier than you think, and now, even if I wanted to sleep in, its rare that I can. Love it. So much peace and quiet and time to think, and just be me. I go to bed early though. Between 9 or 10 pm. Love my sleep too !

Oh ! Had to come back and edit this. A Keto diet has ridden me of awful awful awful debilitating brain fog in the afternoons. I don't stick to it always, but the times I have done it, along with fasting, seem to have permanently cured me of brain fog anyway, even when I'm off the wagon. 

Edited by fiona parker
remembered something else
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To give my two cents. My most valuable habits... 

- Having experimented with various online tools (Evernote, OneNote), for my general to do lists, I've gone back to pen and paper. I have a folder of about 30 pages of A4. Each has a topic (property, investments, personal, different aspects of my day job/other businesses). Pages are in alphabetical order. Every evening, I review the pages and write a one-sheet to do list for the next day.  Crossing out completed tasks out remains satisfying and having it on paper means I can always see the day's to do list without it taking up a screen. 

- In MS Outlook, use recurring reminders in the calendar for regular activities, set a one minute delay on all outgoing emails. Saves time for when inevitable after-thoughts hit you. Separate account for all property emails. 

- Automate activities whenever possible. All of my property activity is wrapped up in an ever-improving Excel spread sheet. All dates, checks, metrics etc. are automated. Dashboard with a traffic lights system on all aspects of the property portfolio (I'm a property geek with a small g). Specialist software would no doubt do the same, but I like the flexibility of Excel. 

- Outsource to experts whenever possible. Hated this at first, but that 500 quid you pay your accountant/tax advisor/broker saves you thousands. 

- As someone else has said - exercise, fresh air. Healthy body, healthy mind! Some of my best ideas come to me when out running. 

- Read (listen on audio) plenty of non-fiction. Rob and Rob recommend great books, Bill Gates publishes a bi-annual recommendation list, non-fiction best seller lists are good. I mainly read non-fiction, only indulge occasionally in self help (I'm motivated enough and the messages are generally fairly similar). I try to limit my news intake (not so easy these days) and other distractions like social media (there's a time and a place for that). Kill notifications!

- Listen to podcasts! Better information than any MBA. 

- A general habit I have developed is to always look for solutions or to add value in any task. Even something as mundane as answering an email, there is value to be added, eg updating the filing system so that information is available next time I'm answering the question, or saving a template answer or whatever. For higher level stuff, I always try to find solutions to problems and consider how to add value in a situation.

- Throw a lot against the wall - explore as many different ideas as possible. Examining all sorts of crazy ideas leads to success in a few and you learn from the stuff that doesn't work out.  

- As others have said, positive thinking is vital. Success probably breeds positivity, but I'm sure positivity breeds success. 

 

Habits that I am working on improving

- Networking and meeting people. I'm better in some areas of life than others. Need to improve my network in UK property (not always easy from Switzerland, but that's a poor excuse).

- Delegate - and keep delegating. Although my work life balance is good, I should delegate more so I can take on more. 'No' is also a good word to use occasionally. Starting new projects/working on new ideas is a great way to force yourself to delegate other tasks (unless you're a control freak).  

- Active listening. It's all too tempting to talk, but so much better to listen. 

- Ask for help. People generally like to help and it saves time and money. 

- Never read the bottom half of the internet. It's a sewer. Even more important - never get into an online debate. Life is way too short. 

 

 

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18 hours ago, jj_investor said:

To give my two cents. My most valuable habits... 

- Having experimented with various online tools (Evernote, OneNote), for my general to do lists, I've gone back to pen and paper. I have a folder of about 30 pages of A4. Each has a topic (property, investments, personal, different aspects of my day job/other businesses). Pages are in alphabetical order. Every evening, I review the pages and write a one-sheet to do list for the next day.  Crossing out completed tasks out remains satisfying and having it on paper means I can always see the day's to do list without it taking up a screen. 

- In MS Outlook, use recurring reminders in the calendar for regular activities, set a one minute delay on all outgoing emails. Saves time for when inevitable after-thoughts hit you. Separate account for all property emails. 

- Automate activities whenever possible. All of my property activity is wrapped up in an ever-improving Excel spread sheet. All dates, checks, metrics etc. are automated. Dashboard with a traffic lights system on all aspects of the property portfolio (I'm a property geek with a small g). Specialist software would no doubt do the same, but I like the flexibility of Excel. 

- Outsource to experts whenever possible. Hated this at first, but that 500 quid you pay your accountant/tax advisor/broker saves you thousands. 

- As someone else has said - exercise, fresh air. Healthy body, healthy mind! Some of my best ideas come to me when out running. 

- Read (listen on audio) plenty of non-fiction. Rob and Rob recommend great books, Bill Gates publishes a bi-annual recommendation list, non-fiction best seller lists are good. I mainly read non-fiction, only indulge occasionally in self help (I'm motivated enough and the messages are generally fairly similar). I try to limit my news intake (not so easy these days) and other distractions like social media (there's a time and a place for that). Kill notifications!

- Listen to podcasts! Better information than any MBA. 

- A general habit I have developed is to always look for solutions or to add value in any task. Even something as mundane as answering an email, there is value to be added, eg updating the filing system so that information is available next time I'm answering the question, or saving a template answer or whatever. For higher level stuff, I always try to find solutions to problems and consider how to add value in a situation.

- Throw a lot against the wall - explore as many different ideas as possible. Examining all sorts of crazy ideas leads to success in a few and you learn from the stuff that doesn't work out.  

- As others have said, positive thinking is vital. Success probably breeds positivity, but I'm sure positivity breeds success. 

 

Habits that I am working on improving

- Networking and meeting people. I'm better in some areas of life than others. Need to improve my network in UK property (not always easy from Switzerland, but that's a poor excuse).

- Delegate - and keep delegating. Although my work life balance is good, I should delegate more so I can take on more. 'No' is also a good word to use occasionally. Starting new projects/working on new ideas is a great way to force yourself to delegate other tasks (unless you're a control freak).  

- Active listening. It's all too tempting to talk, but so much better to listen. 

- Ask for help. People generally like to help and it saves time and money. 

- Never read the bottom half of the internet. It's a sewer. Even more important - never get into an online debate. Life is way too short. 

 

 

jj.....I too have mainly gone back to writing my to do list in my diary. I do use Trello still, which is populated with nearly EVERYTHING my poor brain needed to dump, but still keep in a "safe place"

I probably update/look at Trello, once or twice a week, extrapolate what I need for that week, into my diary, then work out of my diary daily.
I just found that going back to working out of my diary, allows me to "think in ink" 

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I started using the bullet journal method last September and have seen a huge rise in productivity as a result.  Part of my bullet journal is a monthly habit tracker, where I make a list of all the things I'm trying to make a habit of and colour in a square for each day I manage it.  (I am not one of these people whose bullet journal is a work of art - mine is an A5 squared Pukka Pad with a biro!)

Quick 5-minute intro video to the system by the guy who came up with it here:  https://bulletjournal.com/pages/learn

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On 3/23/2019 at 7:03 AM, DaveMarr said:

Hi kent614. I've read his book too, and watched a few videos on his website, which offer detailed suggestions of how to implement the ideas in his book using modern tools like Evernote and the Google suite. (The book's almost 20 years old so outdated on the practical side.)

I've found it very beneficial since I started following his ideas, like my brain isn't so 'busy' because it's freed up, exactly like you say. I'd recommend them to everyone.

I loved this book too. I completely changed how I organise myself about 7 years ago. The best thing is that capturing your ideas in a Next Actions or IN list makes you much calmer and frees you from having to remember what you need to do. But you do need to be disciplined - if you put things in the IN list and then never process that list, you will cease to get benefit because you will know that you’re not in control, and that you still need to remember those items. If you know you WILL process the list, you can let go and focus on your current priorities.

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Reading/listening to podcast/learning - James Clear - Atomic Habits is good while we're on the subject.

Exercise - yoga, walking or HIT workout 

Meditation - if we spent as much time training our minds as we do our bodies....

Gratitude journal - trains your brain to seek out positives, similar effect to Rob's practise of seeing the upside to situations

Set yourself a target of say 5 fails per month (Ramit Sethi's idea not mine) - that way taking risks gets easier and you start seeing failure as something to strive for. Fear of failure can seriously hold you back if you let it.

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10 simple life learned habits ...

- you can achieve what may seem to be the impossible.

- keep an healthy mind, healthy body, love life, be kind to all living things.

- live each day as it was your last one.

- be yourself, be humble, enjoy your achievements, learn from your mistakes.

- never hold a grudge or close that door on anyone or anything.

- learn to listen to others, no matter how dull or ignorant, they will have their own 'life learned habits' that can make you think 'hey why not that'!

there is no need to prove anything to anyone other than to yourself.

- do not concern yourself or worry about anything that you have zero control of.

- if it doesn't fit, then don't force it.

- be careful not to be that 'peter principle' person.

 

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