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Hello All,

This is a bit of a strange topic as this is spoken from a tenants point but here it goes. 

My cousin has just started his second year of university at Nottingham and has moved into a shared house with other students. As far as i am aware this house has been let out to students majority of the time. (I know students aren't the cleanest of people). Anyway my cousin has discovered mold on one of the walls in his bedroom, and when he came home last weekend he was saying that he had chest pains.... 

He has a dehumidifier which he has been leaving on more regularly and says it has reduced the mold a little. However the landlord came to visit the property the other day to check on the property (something to do with the WI-FI) but he also looked in the rooms and noticed the mold. Well his response was find a scraper and get scraping (Not sure it was worded exactly like that) So i was wondering if there is anything that could be done either getting my cousin to try and fix it (providing the landlord is happy with that) or a way to get the landlord to fix it for him, which from his reaction when he found the mold didn't seem to inclined to do.  

I know there is a selective licensing which has been brought into Nottingham is this of any use? Or could me cousin maybe appeal to get the mold fixed. I'm not trying to be awkward and cause work or a cost to the landlord, but i would hate if a tenant was getting chest pains or had mold in one of their rooms.

I hope someone could give some advice on this. 

Kind regards,

Jay

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Mold often occurs with condensation, generally the result of elevated moisture levels through cloth drying, showers, low heating levels, inadequate ventilation, or more likely a combination of factors.  (It may be a building defect, but in a student environment I’d look elsewhere first). 
 

You can treat/remove mold (spray cleaner) but it will reoccur unless the cause is removed. 

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Yes!

As mentioned above, find the cause of mold. Black Mold likes warm moist unventilated areas.

I advise....buying damp or moisture tester 

https://www.toolstation.com/draper-mini-moisture-meter/p55818

Something like this ^^

And test the affected areas for damp. They are easy to use.

If excessive damp is found, after purge ventilation ie opening the windows and letting a draught through the place. Then the building fabric, gutters, roof or leaky pipework is probably to blame, and you can inform the landlord of the problem.

Your demhumidier may be causing chest pain as well as the mould could. You shouldn't have a dehumidifier on at same time and in the same room as a person is sleeping for example.

They tend to wake up a bit thirsty! If they wake up at all!

This is the time of year when mould appears, dont be alarmed, it's a natural living thing that is growing because the environment it's in allows it to grow and flourish.

Find the cause, the the mould cant live.

Maybe upload a photo so we can see the extent of the mould?

Hope this helps

Conrad Paton

 

 


Conrad Paton

+44 7957 959851

conradpaton@yahoo.co.uk

https://www.linkedin.com/in/conrad-paton-424446110

 

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Conrad / Alistar 

Thanks for the information. 

He only puts the dehumidifier on whilst he is out at uni (which is most of the day) he doesn't leave it on at night. Also from what he told me there are vents in the room as far as he can see. I will try and get him to send me a picture and I will upload this for you guys to see! 

Thanks for the help!

Kind regards,

Jay

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Hi,

As a landlord myself (not HMO), I make sure that all my properties are free from damp/mould. 90% of the time it is caused by condensation. The best way to deal with this and stop it reoccurring is to get a positive pressure unit, if you or the landlord of the property is competent in electrical installation these area cheap enough, if not get a company called envirovent. I have these in a number of properties and the mould caused by condensation has stopped completely.

It is a landlords responsibility and I’d hope they have a duty of care for their tenants to free the house from this. In the long term I believe it can cause health issues.

How I look at this, I wouldn’t like to live in them conditions so I wouldn’t expect others too either.

All the best and keep us posted,

Jase

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On 10/31/2019 at 8:16 AM, Jay Dove said:

Conrad / Alistar 

Thanks for the information. 

He only puts the dehumidifier on whilst he is out at uni (which is most of the day) he doesn't leave it on at night. Also from what he told me there are vents in the room as far as he can see. I will try and get him to send me a picture and I will upload this for you guys to see! 

Thanks for the help!

Kind regards,

Jay

Any update on this mould issue? Just curious as having mould in a property which is let, I really don’t like.

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My daughter is at uni in Nottingham and her house, whilst not bad, is damper this year then last because of all the wet weather.

My tips:

1. Get a damp trap or two to take water out of the room by absorption - I use killrock ones

2. Keep the room a bit warmer to prevent excessive condensate forming out of cold air - students are not usually experienced enough to work out how to heat the house efficiently and big changes in temperatures can cause more condensation. The system may need ‘balancing’ to get more warmth in his room

3. Put thick curtains up to minimise the cold spot at the window

4. Dry clothes and towels elsewhere if possible

5. Don’t stack things against cold outside walls as condensation and mould will form

6. Use a fungicide to clean where mould has been - more effective than bleach

7. Ventilate the room when possible and leave the door open to allow air to circulate throughout the house if sensible to do so

8. If the mould continues pester the LL to do something. I found using anti mould bathroom paint helpful in reducing mould

8. See a doctor about chest pains - they may be unrelated and dangerous!

 

Good luck :)

 

 

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8 hours ago, julia urquhart said:

My daughter is at uni in Nottingham and her house, whilst not bad, is damper this year then last because of all the wet weather.

My tips:

1. Get a damp trap or two to take water out of the room by absorption - I use killrock ones

2. Keep the room a bit warmer to prevent excessive condensate forming out of cold air - students are not usually experienced enough to work out how to heat the house efficiently and big changes in temperatures can cause more condensation. The system may need ‘balancing’ to get more warmth in his room

3. Put thick curtains up to minimise the cold spot at the window

4. Dry clothes and towels elsewhere if possible

5. Don’t stack things against cold outside walls as condensation and mould will form

6. Use a fungicide to clean where mould has been - more effective than bleach

7. Ventilate the room when possible and leave the door open to allow air to circulate throughout the house if sensible to do so

8. If the mould continues pester the LL to do something. I found using anti mould bathroom paint helpful in reducing mould

8. See a doctor about chest pains - they may be unrelated and dangerous!

 

Good luck :)

 

 

@julia urquhart I do appreciate what you are saying and your advice is great.

But really should you have to do that? The landlord gets paid each month for your/daughter and @Jay Dove brother to live there. 

They, the landlord should sort the issues especially if it serve and causing health issues straight away and put there tenants welfare at the forefront. 

 

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The LL should provide a safe and comfortable environment but there is a difference between damp caused by structural issues and damp caused by how a house is lived in.

Student houses have a large number of adults living in close proximity which produces extra condensation due to cooking, showering, washing etc individually. If the mould and damp is caused by the way the house is used rather than a structural problem the LL will not be able to fix it and it will be up to the tenant.

Also, due to the short term nature of a student let you need to get it sorted quickly so being proactive yourself is the best option.

Unfortunately some LLs see students as cash cows and will make little effort to solve the problem and students often don’t realise there is a problem until they have moved in. Sometimes a few small changes can make a big difference.

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Yes I agree with students being cash cows but this is 100% wrong and gives LL bad names.

Damp caused by living conditions is very easily fixable as I said below with a positive pressure unit. I had 6 people living in a semi 4 grown up two younger. I tried everything, 4 years ago I fitted one of these units and there hasn’t been any since, not even a drop of condensation on the window. There are various makes and models and I would Recommend 100%. 

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On 11/6/2019 at 8:29 PM, snookjas said:

Yes I agree with students being cash cows but this is 100% wrong and gives LL bad names.

Damp caused by living conditions is very easily fixable as I said below with a positive pressure unit. I had 6 people living in a semi 4 grown up two younger. I tried everything, 4 years ago I fitted one of these units and there hasn’t been any since, not even a drop of condensation on the window. There are various makes and models and I would Recommend 100%. 

Hi,

I agree with every @snookjas is saying.

Landlord should be more responsible and let their tenants live how they the landlord would expect to live.

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