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Underfloor heating - is it a viable option for HMO's instead of radiators?


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Hi all, I'm just working through the costings and specs for sending out a spec of works to builders. One thing I'm trying to find out is would underfloor heating be an option to heat an HMO? I'm wanting to look at eradicating the need for gas particularly from an environmental stand point and use a green supplier for the electric. The property is a three storey (with potential to develop the cellar) 6 beds/6 ensuite semi detached house. 

Any thoughts on this would be gratefully received. 

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In short , yes.  It’s efficient but as with all things there are differing qualities (and costs).  They are slow / unresponsive, but require little maintenance and operate at relatively low temperatures (less heat less cost). Key is mass, insulation, and air tightness.  

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I think underfloor heating is a great option. It saves you losing wallspace for radiators. I have underfloor heating in some of my properties, and things rarely go wrong 

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Vin Gupta
Property Investor and Developer
UK Property Blog: https://evolutionblogger.com/article/uk-property-articles
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If you are talking about LTHW underfloor heating, and environmental performance is your main goal, you could also consider an air source heat pump. Always better to reduce consumption before offsetting. You may also benefit from the renewable heat incentive, making it more financially viable.

Also check if your utility company generates their renewable electricity or if it just buys the certificates. By choosing the right company you are increasing demand for renewable capacity, rather than certificates.

Assuming your building is already well insulated and air tight, ASHP's pair well with underfloor heating and offer a much higher COP compared to conventional boilers. Although you may also need a hot water cylinder if it's a larger property!

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