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EPC Dilemma getting rid of Boiler


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Hi Everyone.

 

I am in a bit of a tricky situation. My house is currently not rented. I had a very old boiler, which was hang to a stone wall that was always wet and cold. We removed the boiler and had a Gas Engineer cap the line to repair the wall. The extra height of the plaster and insulation now makes the space between the boiler and the door very narrow, so the door will not fully open, which is why I think it was removed before.

The problem with the boiler is that I don't use heating. The temperature rarely drops below 14C and I find it more economical to just use an halogen heater to take the chills on the odd times. Having a new boiler commissioned is £1200 to £2000 depending on the warranties (with no guarantees that the exiting CH loop will not have further problems with leaks or blockages), so we just decided to install a instantaneous water heater to supply the shower and we already had instantaneous hot water points at the kitchen and bathroom.

The property is tiny - a 1 bed house with 2 CH radiators. 

The problem came, that as I was inquiring on renting (as I may have to move for a while) I am told the old stone house with solid walls may not make it to the required EPC's without a gas boiler for heating and DHW. I want to ask is this true? I have double glazing and loft insulation, with an older wood door (that could perhaps be replaced with a PVC)

I feel very conflicted with this - Paying on average £60 for electric and £15 for gas (standing charge + hob usage) I will never ever recoup the investment of a boiler over the 10 years service life period, but the penalty for not having gas is so high that I don't really know what my options are. Will my house be rentable? I'm told this will decrease at least 1 band and not sure what to do - even an air to air heat pump is classed as a regular electric heater, despite the efficiency being many times larger.

There even seems to be points taken out for having efficient instantaneous water heaters, versus inefficient cylinders set to off peak time.

Any EPC inspectors that could shed some light here?

 

Many Thanks!

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The only way to find out is to have an EPC done. Ring round and get a cheap quote - usually can be done for £50 - then you can see where you are.

The answer might be to have a storage heater fitted instead of replacing your boiler. At present you only need to get to an E.

Not sure I would want to rent your house with heating - 14C is pretty cold in my book!

Good luck :)

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On 12/4/2020 at 11:39 PM, casemod said:

I will never ever recoup the investment of a boiler over the 10 years service life period,

As far as I can tell, you have a property that virtually nobody (except yourself, of course) would rent.

So, simple mathematics:

10 years at zero rent = 0.

10 years at, lets be silly, rent of £50 pcm, = £6000 less the boiler cost still seems to be a plus in my book....

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2 minutes ago, dennis hughes said:

As far as I can tell, you have a property that virtually nobody (except yourself, of course) would rent.

So, simple mathematics:

10 years at zero rent = 0.

10 years at, lets be silly, rent of £50 pcm, = £6000 less the boiler cost still seems to be a plus in my book....

Dennis, The potential savings for gas are not really significant on such a small property. This is simply the reason I don't use them myself. A good quality electric central heating is set and forget, allows individual zoned control and discourages tenants to dry their clothes on the radiators, creating damp in the property.

Julia, good point.

I did check up on my exiting EPC and adding solar actually neglects the penalty for electric heating. Its a bit more expensive than a boiler, but not as much I thought. Plus I would feel much better knowing some of the generation would offset the energy usage.

I think for now I will wait for the 2025 gas ban in new built properties. I'm sure that will shake up the market a bit and make heat pumps a more common option, just like condensing boilers, which were once a premium, are now standard.

Thank you both for your comments.

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@casemod Your original post made no mention of your seemingly preferred (?) option of electric heating???

And is the good point that you congratulate @julia urquharton the fact that she probably would not want to rent your property?

Now you are mentioning heat pumps.

I am too confused now, you seem to want some form of validation for something...

 

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